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The effects of faking on the construct validity of personality questionnaires: a direct faking measure approach / Maša Tonković Grabovac, Željko Jerneić, Zvonimir Galić.

By: Tonković Grabovac, Maša.
Contributor(s): Galić, Zvonimir [aut] | Jerneić, Željko [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 455-472 str.Subject(s): 5.06 | faking, personality questionnaire, construct validity, direct measure of faking hrv | faking, personality questionnaire, construct validity, direct measure of faking engOnline resources: Elektronička verzija članka In: Psychological Topics 21 (2012), 3 ; str. 455-472Abstract: Some research clearly showed that faking reduces the construct validity of personality questionnaires, whilst many other showed no such effect. A possible explanation for mixed results could be searched for in a variety of methodological strategies in forming comparative groups supposed to differ in the level of faking: candidates vs. non-candidates ; groups of individuals with high vs. low social desirability score ; and groups given instructions to respond honest vs. instructions to “fake good”. All the three strategies can be criticized for addressing the faking problem indirectly – assuming that comparative groups really differ in the level of response distortion, which might not be true. Therefore, in a within-subject design study we examined how faking affects the construct validity of personality inventories using a direct measure of faking. The results suggested that faking reduces the construct validity of personality questionnaires gradually – the effect was stronger in the subsample of participants who distorted their responses in greater extent.
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Some research clearly showed that faking reduces the construct validity of personality questionnaires, whilst many other showed no such effect. A possible explanation for mixed results could be searched for in a variety of methodological strategies in forming comparative groups supposed to differ in the level of faking: candidates vs. non-candidates ; groups of individuals with high vs. low social desirability score ; and groups given instructions to respond honest vs. instructions to “fake good”. All the three strategies can be criticized for addressing the faking problem indirectly – assuming that comparative groups really differ in the level of response distortion, which might not be true. Therefore, in a within-subject design study we examined how faking affects the construct validity of personality inventories using a direct measure of faking. The results suggested that faking reduces the construct validity of personality questionnaires gradually – the effect was stronger in the subsample of participants who distorted their responses in greater extent.

Projekt MZOS 130-0000000-3282

ENG

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