Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Literary Languages Between Choice and Imagination / Peti-Stantić, Anita.

By: Peti-Stantić, Anita.
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 307-313 str.Other title: Literary Languages Between Choice and Imagination [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.03 | literary language, Slovene, Croatian, language policy, language planning, language culture hrv | literary language, Slovene, Croatian, language policy, language planning, language culture engOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Infrastruktura slovenščine in slovenistike (26.-28.11.2009. ; Ljubljana, Slovenija) Infrastruktura slovenščine in slovenistike : zbornik recenziranih znanstvenih prispevkov na domači konferenci = The Infrastructure of the Slovene Language and Slovene Studies : proceedings str. 307-313Stabej, MarkoSummary: The author presents the idea that the language policy is ultimately grounded in linguistic culture, that is, the set of behaviours, assumptions, cultural forms, prejudices, folk belief systems, attitudes, stereotypes and ways of thinking about language, as well as the religious-historical circumstances associated with that particular language. For that reason, the history of literary language formation, especially the recent history, has to be taken into respect. The Croatian example is especially illuminating because it clearly shows that a language community based on communication may follow its own path, while the literary language community based on a traditional linguistic culture may go a different way, but also that the literary langauge community is based on a linguistic culture and traditions which are at the same time imagined and historically justified. Since this was not recognised by those who represented overt language policy after the break-up of Yugoslavia, many changes that were proposed missed the point and were not accepted.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

The author presents the idea that the language policy is ultimately grounded in linguistic culture, that is, the set of behaviours, assumptions, cultural forms, prejudices, folk belief systems, attitudes, stereotypes and ways of thinking about language, as well as the religious-historical circumstances associated with that particular language. For that reason, the history of literary language formation, especially the recent history, has to be taken into respect. The Croatian example is especially illuminating because it clearly shows that a language community based on communication may follow its own path, while the literary language community based on a traditional linguistic culture may go a different way, but also that the literary langauge community is based on a linguistic culture and traditions which are at the same time imagined and historically justified. Since this was not recognised by those who represented overt language policy after the break-up of Yugoslavia, many changes that were proposed missed the point and were not accepted.

Projekt MZOS 130-1301044-0989

ENG

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//