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Fictions of loss in the Victorian fin de siècle / Stephen Arata.

By: Arata, Stephen.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008Description: XII, 235 str. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780521101271; 0521563526 (hardback).Subject(s): engleska književnost - 19. stoljeće - književne studijeOnline resources: Table of contents | Publisher description Summary: It has been widely recognized that British culture in the 1880s and 1890s was marked by a sense of irretrievable decline. Fictions of Loss in the Victorian Fin de Siecle explores the ways in which that perception of loss was cast into narrative, into archetypal stories which sought to account for the culture's troubles and perhaps assuage its anxieties. Stephen Arata pays close attention to fin-de-siecle representations of three forms of decline - national, biological, and aesthetic - and reveals how late-Victorian degeneration theory was used to 'explain' such decline. By examining a wide range of writers - from Kipling to Wilde, from Symonds to Conan Doyle and Stoker - Arata shows how the nation's twin obsessions with decadence and imperialism became intertwined in the thought of the period. His account offers new insights for students and scholars of the fin de siecle.
List(s) this item appears in: kroatistika-2016
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Knjige (projekti) Knjige (projekti) Knjižnica FFZG
3. kat, slavenska filologija
Kroatistika D20.22 ARA f (Browse shelf) Checked out 2019-11-21 1305198598
Total holds: 0

Bibliografske bilješke: str. 185-228 ; Kazalo: str. 229-235

It has been widely recognized that British culture in the 1880s and 1890s was marked by a sense of irretrievable decline. Fictions of Loss in the Victorian Fin de Siecle explores the ways in which that perception of loss was cast into narrative, into archetypal stories which sought to account for the culture's troubles and perhaps assuage its anxieties. Stephen Arata pays close attention to fin-de-siecle representations of three forms of decline - national, biological, and aesthetic - and reveals how late-Victorian degeneration theory was used to 'explain' such decline. By examining a wide range of writers - from Kipling to Wilde, from Symonds to Conan Doyle and Stoker - Arata shows how the nation's twin obsessions with decadence and imperialism became intertwined in the thought of the period. His account offers new insights for students and scholars of the fin de siecle.

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