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The Awful Truth: On Metonymic Rationality in Hawks and Cavell / Tatjana Jukić.

By: Jukić, Tatjana.
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2015Description: 99-115 str.ISSN: 0039-3339.Other title: The Awful Truth: On Metonymic Rationality in Hawks and Cavell [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.03 | Stanley Cavell, Howard Hawks, American cinema, philosophy of film, metonymy engOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Studia Romanica et Anglica Zagrabiensia 60 (2015), str. 99-115Summary: My text analyzes the agency of melancholia and melodrama in the philosophy of Stanley Cavell, where they labor as a sinthome of what in philosophy is memory. This analysis hinges on a close reading of Stefan Zweig's Letter from an Unknown When Stanley Cavell analyzes Hollywood comedies of remarriage, he mobilizes their narratives as the platform from which to address America as a political and a philosophical project. This is also where Cavell acknowledges the affinity of the cinematic narrative and psychoanalysis, most notably perhaps in his sustained interest in the Hollywood woman as a spectacle of crisis and critique. With this in mind, I propose to discuss the Cavellian woman, of his cinema books, who dominates the “green world” of the Hollywood remarriage comedy: the bucolic story-space which Cavell associates with the Emersonian vision of America and identifies as definitive to its critical character. I focus however on the comedy in which there seems to be no climactic green world – Howard Hawks’ His Girl Friday (1940) – and argue that Hawks’ woman mobilizes metropolitan courtrooms and the adjacent spaces in a similar fashion, as if to suggest that the Emersonian green world is not absent from Hawks’ film but rather metonymic to the positions America would assign to (pure) reason. Finally, I show how this Cavellian complex corresponds to Gilles Deleuze’s philosophical fascination with woman, film and America.
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My text analyzes the agency of melancholia and melodrama in the philosophy of Stanley Cavell, where they labor as a sinthome of what in philosophy is memory. This analysis hinges on a close reading of Stefan Zweig's Letter from an Unknown When Stanley Cavell analyzes Hollywood comedies of remarriage, he mobilizes their narratives as the platform from which to address America as a political and a philosophical project. This is also where Cavell acknowledges the affinity of the cinematic narrative and psychoanalysis, most notably perhaps in his sustained interest in the Hollywood woman as a spectacle of crisis and critique. With this in mind, I propose to discuss the Cavellian woman, of his cinema books, who dominates the “green world” of the Hollywood remarriage comedy: the bucolic story-space which Cavell associates with the Emersonian vision of America and identifies as definitive to its critical character. I focus however on the comedy in which there seems to be no climactic green world – Howard Hawks’ His Girl Friday (1940) – and argue that Hawks’ woman mobilizes metropolitan courtrooms and the adjacent spaces in a similar fashion, as if to suggest that the Emersonian green world is not absent from Hawks’ film but rather metonymic to the positions America would assign to (pure) reason. Finally, I show how this Cavellian complex corresponds to Gilles Deleuze’s philosophical fascination with woman, film and America.

HRZZ-IP HRZZ-IP-11-2013-1543

130-1301070-1064

ENG

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