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The asymptote of life and death of the Late Roman Period in Split (Croatia) / Zdravka Hincak, Helga Zglav-Martinac.

By: Hincak, Zdravka.
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 35-48 str.Subject(s): 6.07 | anthropological analysis, Late Roman Period, Split, Croatia In: Convegno internazionale di studi Territorio e insediamenti fra tarda antichità e alto medioevo (2013 ; Cimitile-Santa Maria Capua Vetere). Territorio, Insediamenti e Necropoli fra Tarda Antichita e Alto Medioevo" Atti del Convegno internazionale di studi Territorio e insediamenti fra tarda antichità e alto medioevo Cimitile-Santa Maria Capua Vetere, 13-14 giugno 2013. ; Atti del Convegno internazionale di studi Luoghi di culto, necropoli e prassi funeraria fra tarda antichità e medioevo Cimitile-Santa Maria Capua Vetere, 19-20 giugno 2014Summary: During the provincial Roman period the necropolis extend outside the town walls and develop from the moment of the town founding. Very rarely, at that period, graves spread inside the walls due to a town degradation or destruction. Good examples are presented in Dalmatia and Pannonia, where inside the walls exist cleared parcels or insuli as a nucleus of family graveyards in development. Together with Roman, Christian grave areas develop very early in towns, but also inside the houses, as a sign of uncertain times, when it is dangerous to step out of the town walls. Such burying practice is more common in small towns. Diocletian’s Palace was a palace, a production drive, and a center of an estate. Who were its inhabitants? A military garrison, craftsmen, merchants and in the final phase, also refugees. It was a fortress, a Late Roman period palace, typologically defined as a fortified villa rustica. Firstly, it was imagined as a palace, villa rustica with residential, economic, ceremonial and defense functions. As mentioned before, it was a palace with a manufacture drive. There are many theories about the exact production of the estate, the most accepted being cloth manufacturing.
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During the provincial Roman period the necropolis extend outside the town walls and develop from the moment of the town founding. Very rarely, at that period, graves spread inside the walls due to a town degradation or destruction. Good examples are presented in Dalmatia and Pannonia, where inside the walls exist cleared parcels or insuli as a nucleus of family graveyards in development. Together with Roman, Christian grave areas develop very early in towns, but also inside the houses, as a sign of uncertain times, when it is dangerous to step out of the town walls. Such burying practice is more common in small towns. Diocletian’s Palace was a palace, a production drive, and a center of an estate. Who were its inhabitants? A military garrison, craftsmen, merchants and in the final phase, also refugees. It was a fortress, a Late Roman period palace, typologically defined as a fortified villa rustica. Firstly, it was imagined as a palace, villa rustica with residential, economic, ceremonial and defense functions. As mentioned before, it was a palace with a manufacture drive. There are many theories about the exact production of the estate, the most accepted being cloth manufacturing.

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