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Self-perceived popularity in early adolescence: accuracy, associations with loneliness, and gender differences / Putarek, Vanja ; Keresteš, Gordana.

By: Putarek, Vanja.
Contributor(s): Keresteš, Gordana [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 257-274 str.Other title: Self-perceived popularity in early adolescence: accuracy, associations with loneliness, and gender differences [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | Accuracy, early adolescence, gender differences, loneliness, self-perceived popularity | Accuracy, early adolescence, gender differences, loneliness, self-perceived popularity In: Journal of social and personal relationships 33 (2016), 2 ; str. 257-274Abstract: This study examined the accuracy of sixth- and seventh-grade boys’ and girls’ selfperceived popularity within a group of same- and opposite-gender peers. The links between popularity, self-perceived popularity, and the interaction of these variables in relation to girls’ and boys’ loneliness was also explored. The results showed that boys and girls overestimated their popularity but overestimations were greater when self- perceptions were compared with perceptions of opposite- rather than same-gender peers. Perceiving oneself as popular, as well as actually being perceived as popular by others, was related to less loneliness in both boys and girls. The interaction between self-perceived popularity and actual popularity did not explain significant variance in loneliness above and beyond the contributions of actual and self-perceived popularity.
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This study examined the accuracy of sixth- and seventh-grade boys’ and girls’ selfperceived popularity within a group of same- and opposite-gender peers. The links between popularity, self-perceived popularity, and the interaction of these variables in relation to girls’ and boys’ loneliness was also explored. The results showed that boys and girls overestimated their popularity but overestimations were greater when self- perceptions were compared with perceptions of opposite- rather than same-gender peers. Perceiving oneself as popular, as well as actually being perceived as popular by others, was related to less loneliness in both boys and girls. The interaction between self-perceived popularity and actual popularity did not explain significant variance in loneliness above and beyond the contributions of actual and self-perceived popularity.

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