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On advantages of conservation history for life / Špikić, Marko.

By: Špikić, Marko.
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 173-179 str.Other title: On advantages of conservation history for life [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.06 | conservation; conservation history; perception of the past eng In: Heritage in Transformation. Heritage Protection in the 21st Century - Problems, Challenges, Predictions / edt Boguslaw SzmyginSummary: History of conservation is a genre that has its beginnings in theoretical texts on conservation from at least Quatremère de Quincy’s times. The origins of such a history can be traced in the theoretical texts by Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, Camillo Boito, Alois Riegl, Max Dvořák and Gustavo Giovannoni, extending to the post-war generation which started to historicise the modern discipline. Thanks to the works by Paul Léon, Carlo Ceschi, Jukka Jokilehto and Miles Glendinning, who created a historical narrative of national, continental and global history of conservation, the genre became vital and applicable. What can, or should, we learn from these histories? Could it be considered a magistra vitae, a source of inspiration, or a warning about the disadvantages of certain professional and social experiments dealing with the image and semantics of cultural heritage? As Hayden White writes, the more we know about the past, the harder it is to generalize about it. Consequently, the more we know about the rich conservation history, the harder it is to disavow its previous achievements. This paper, therefore, discusses the role, importance, or irrelevance of historical knowledge for the conservation in Europe after 1989.
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History of conservation is a genre that has its beginnings in theoretical texts on conservation from at least Quatremère de Quincy’s times. The origins of such a history can be traced in the theoretical texts by Eugene-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc, Camillo Boito, Alois Riegl, Max Dvořák and Gustavo Giovannoni, extending to the post-war generation which started to historicise the modern discipline. Thanks to the works by Paul Léon, Carlo Ceschi, Jukka Jokilehto and Miles Glendinning, who created a historical narrative of national, continental and global history of conservation, the genre became vital and applicable. What can, or should, we learn from these histories? Could it be considered a magistra vitae, a source of inspiration, or a warning about the disadvantages of certain professional and social experiments dealing with the image and semantics of cultural heritage? As Hayden White writes, the more we know about the past, the harder it is to generalize about it. Consequently, the more we know about the rich conservation history, the harder it is to disavow its previous achievements. This paper, therefore, discusses the role, importance, or irrelevance of historical knowledge for the conservation in Europe after 1989.

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