Normal view MARC view ISBD view

To conceal or not to conceal one's sexual orientation? LGB's minority stress in Croatia / Aleksandra Huić, Margareta Jelić, Željka Kamenov.

By: Huić, Aleksandra.
Contributor(s): Jelić, Margareta [aut] | Kamenov, Željka [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 31-31 str.Other title: To conceal or not to conceal one's sexual orientation? - LGB's minority stress in Croatia [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | minority stress; LGB; sexual orientation; concealment | minority stress; LGB; sexual orientation; concealment In: 37th STAR Conference "Stress and Anxiety in a Changing Society" str. 31-31Abstract: According to the minority stress model, LGBs experience adverse environmental circumstances which represent a source of social stress and lead to their poor mental health. This study examined the tenants of this model in Croatia, a country with relatively negative attitudes and a relatively high incidence of discrimination against LGBs. Based on the model we posited that the perception of low LGB social and legal status in the Croatian society today will lead to more concealment of one's sexual orientation, which will in turn lead to less opportunity for social support and in the end to poorer mental health. A total of 410 lesbians, gays and bisexuals participated in the study. Participants filled out several questionnaires (Perception of LGB status in Croatian society ; Concealment of Sexual Orientation Scale ; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support ; Satisfaction with Life Scale ; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale – 21). Results support the paths of the minority stress model for LGBs in Croatia. In general, concealing one's sexual identity was associated with less life satisfaction and more negative mental health. Also, having more social support from friends, family and a special someone was tied to better mental health. Concealing one's sexual identity had a direct effect on poorer mental health and less life satisfaction. It also had an indirect effect leading to the same negative outcomes through less social support. Perceiving one's status in a society as disadvantaged did not directly lead to poor mental health. However, it did lead to more concealment of one's sexual orientation which in turn led to less social support and in the end to less life satisfaction and more depression, anxiety and stress. All the results were the same even when controlling for different sexual identities.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

According to the minority stress model, LGBs experience adverse environmental circumstances which represent a source of social stress and lead to their poor mental health. This study examined the tenants of this model in Croatia, a country with relatively negative attitudes and a relatively high incidence of discrimination against LGBs. Based on the model we posited that the perception of low LGB social and legal status in the Croatian society today will lead to more concealment of one's sexual orientation, which will in turn lead to less opportunity for social support and in the end to poorer mental health. A total of 410 lesbians, gays and bisexuals participated in the study. Participants filled out several questionnaires (Perception of LGB status in Croatian society ; Concealment of Sexual Orientation Scale ; Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support ; Satisfaction with Life Scale ; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale – 21). Results support the paths of the minority stress model for LGBs in Croatia. In general, concealing one's sexual identity was associated with less life satisfaction and more negative mental health. Also, having more social support from friends, family and a special someone was tied to better mental health. Concealing one's sexual identity had a direct effect on poorer mental health and less life satisfaction. It also had an indirect effect leading to the same negative outcomes through less social support. Perceiving one's status in a society as disadvantaged did not directly lead to poor mental health. However, it did lead to more concealment of one's sexual orientation which in turn led to less social support and in the end to less life satisfaction and more depression, anxiety and stress. All the results were the same even when controlling for different sexual identities.

Projekt MZOS projekt

ENG

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//