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Athletes perfectionism in relation to their attributions for the most and least successful competition performance / Tandarić, Rebeka ; Jelić, Margareta ; Barić, Renata.

By: Tandarić, Rebeka.
Contributor(s): Jelić, Margareta [aut] | Barić, Renata [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 352 str.Other title: Athletes perfectionism in relation to their attributions for the most and least successful competition performance [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | perfect, sport, resons | perfect, sport, reasons In: 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology str. 352Abstract: Success in sport often means perfect performance.Understanding perfectionism can help us discover how to properly develop high standards for performance which are necessary for the success in sport and at the same time reduce the tendency of excessive self-criticism and self-blame that can compromise this success.The aim of this study is to examine the differences in attributions for success and failure in sport between positive(adaptive) perfectionists, negative(maladaptive) perfectionists and non-perfectionists.We expect that adaptive perfectionists will express attributions which are considered desirable in sport situations in a greater extent than maladaptive perfectionists.In this study we used Dual process model of perfectionism (Slade & Owens, 1998) and categorical approach to separate participants into three groups.In their model, Slade & Owens(1998) suggested that individual whose motivation derives from positive perfectionism would be someone who wants to win and achieve positive reinforcement but for whom failure will not have any longterm consequences.In contrast, an individual who is driven by negative perfectionism will constantly want to win to avoid failure.In this case winning will mean little but failure will have major negative personal consequences.This leads to the prediction that athletes who have more pronounced one or the other form of perfectionism will express differences before and subsequent to competition.The sample is made from 106 Croatian judo players (international level competitors).We used CDS-II(McAuley et.al.1992), PANPS(Terry-Short et.al.1995) and performed nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test.Results show significant differences on the locus and personal control for success and stability and external control for failure.Adaptive perfectionists make more internal and personally controlled attributions for their most successful performance and also less stable and externally controlled attributions for their least successful performance than the maladaptive perfectionists thus partially making more desirable attributions for sport situations.Greatest contribution of this research is further understanding of the rarely investigated relationship between attributions and perfectionism in sport.
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Success in sport often means perfect performance.Understanding perfectionism can help us discover how to properly develop high standards for performance which are necessary for the success in sport and at the same time reduce the tendency of excessive self-criticism and self-blame that can compromise this success.The aim of this study is to examine the differences in attributions for success and failure in sport between positive(adaptive) perfectionists, negative(maladaptive) perfectionists and non-perfectionists.We expect that adaptive perfectionists will express attributions which are considered desirable in sport situations in a greater extent than maladaptive perfectionists.In this study we used Dual process model of perfectionism (Slade & Owens, 1998) and categorical approach to separate participants into three groups.In their model, Slade & Owens(1998) suggested that individual whose motivation derives from positive perfectionism would be someone who wants to win and achieve positive reinforcement but for whom failure will not have any longterm consequences.In contrast, an individual who is driven by negative perfectionism will constantly want to win to avoid failure.In this case winning will mean little but failure will have major negative personal consequences.This leads to the prediction that athletes who have more pronounced one or the other form of perfectionism will express differences before and subsequent to competition.The sample is made from 106 Croatian judo players (international level competitors).We used CDS-II(McAuley et.al.1992), PANPS(Terry-Short et.al.1995) and performed nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test.Results show significant differences on the locus and personal control for success and stability and external control for failure.Adaptive perfectionists make more internal and personally controlled attributions for their most successful performance and also less stable and externally controlled attributions for their least successful performance than the maladaptive perfectionists thus partially making more desirable attributions for sport situations.Greatest contribution of this research is further understanding of the rarely investigated relationship between attributions and perfectionism in sport.

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