Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Using the theory of planned behavior to predict constructive communication during relationship conflict / Tina Krznarić, Aleksandra Huić, Željka Kamenov.

By: Krznarić, Tina.
Contributor(s): Huić, Aleksandra [aut] | Kamenov, Željka [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: str.Other title: Using the theory of planned behavior to predict constructive communication during relationship conflict [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | Theory of planned behavior ; constructive communication ; relationship conflict | Theory of planned behavior ; constructive communication ; relationship conflictOnline resources: Click here to access online In: International Association for Relationship Research Main ConferenceAbstract: The theory of planned behavior (TPB) identifies cognitive self-regulation as an important precursor of human behavior. Although it is one of the most frequently used models in predicting human behavior it is rarely used to predict behaviors in close relationships. Patterns of communication in relationships are amongst the most widely researched and most important behavioral aspects of relationships. More specifically, the ways in which couples communicate during conflicts are associated with marital adjustment, relationship satisfaction and quality, and are predictive of relationship dissolution. This study examined whether constructive communication during conflict can be predicted by the constructs proposed by TPB. A questionnaire assessing attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control was constructed, with constructive communication during relationship conflict being the behavior of interest. Heterosexual young adults (N=204 ; age=18-30 y.) in committed dating relationships participated in the study. Participants first completed the TPB questionnaire, and then, a month later the 7- item constructive communication subscale of the Communication Patterns Questionnaire (CPQ-CC, Christensen & Sullaway, 1984). Structural equation modeling revealed a good fit for the standard TPB model. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control made independent contributions to the prediction of intentions to communicate constructively during conflict, and these intentions predicted reports of actual constructive communication during conflicts a month later. Behavioral, normative, and control beliefs predicted, respectively, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lending further support for the validity of TPB in the context of relationship behavior. Examination of specific TPB factor effects revealed important implications for effective couples’ therapy.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

The theory of planned behavior (TPB) identifies cognitive self-regulation as an important precursor of human behavior. Although it is one of the most frequently used models in predicting human behavior it is rarely used to predict behaviors in close relationships. Patterns of communication in relationships are amongst the most widely researched and most important behavioral aspects of relationships. More specifically, the ways in which couples communicate during conflicts are associated with marital adjustment, relationship satisfaction and quality, and are predictive of relationship dissolution. This study examined whether constructive communication during conflict can be predicted by the constructs proposed by TPB. A questionnaire assessing attitudes, subjective norms and perceived control was constructed, with constructive communication during relationship conflict being the behavior of interest. Heterosexual young adults (N=204 ; age=18-30 y.) in committed dating relationships participated in the study. Participants first completed the TPB questionnaire, and then, a month later the 7- item constructive communication subscale of the Communication Patterns Questionnaire (CPQ-CC, Christensen & Sullaway, 1984). Structural equation modeling revealed a good fit for the standard TPB model. Attitudes, subjective norms, and perceptions of control made independent contributions to the prediction of intentions to communicate constructively during conflict, and these intentions predicted reports of actual constructive communication during conflicts a month later. Behavioral, normative, and control beliefs predicted, respectively, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lending further support for the validity of TPB in the context of relationship behavior. Examination of specific TPB factor effects revealed important implications for effective couples’ therapy.

Projekt MZOS projekt

ENG

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//