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Job insecurity and well-being among Croatian blue- collar shift workers: a role of organizational context / Jasmina Tomas, Darja Maslić Seršić.

By: Tomas, Jasmina.
Contributor(s): Maslić Seršić, Darja [aut].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleDescription: .Other title: Job insecurity and well-being among Croatian blue- collar shift workers: A role of organizational context [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | job insecurity ; blue-collar workers ; psychological climate ; conservation of resources (COR) theory | job insecurity ; blue-collar workers ; psychological climate ; conservation of resources (COR) theoryOnline resources: Click here to access online In: 17th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational PsychologyAbstract: The purpose of the study was to examine the role of quantitative job insecurity in subjective health of industrial shift workers as well as to test several dimensions of the organizational context as potential moderators of this relationship. We defined job insecurity as an additional stressor to shift work and supposed that the organizational context moderates its detrimental consequences on employees’ health. Hypotheses were tested with a survey-based cross- sectional methodology. We defined the organizational context through several working conditions: demands, control, managerial and peer support, relationships, role and change. The HSE Management Standards Analysis Tool, 4-item job insecurity scale and Subjective Health Questionnaire SF-36 were applied to a convenience sample of 641 manufacturing shift workers of various age, gender and organizational tenure, employed in three Croatian factories. The hypotheses were generally supported: job insecurity predicted lower levels of workers’ self-reported physical, psychological and general health while a beneficial organizational context buffered this negative relationship. However, night work and job insecurity did not explain individual differences in health. The convenience sample and cross- sectional methodology limit the interpretations of the findings, especially their generalizability, as well as the possibility of causal inferences about the tested relationships. The study identifies several organizational factors as buffers of detrimental consequences of job insecurity among manufacturing workers which have been recognized as a vulnerable labour force. The study contributes to previous knowledge with some valuable insights on the impact of job insecurity among highly demanding blue-collar jobs.
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The purpose of the study was to examine the role of quantitative job insecurity in subjective health of industrial shift workers as well as to test several dimensions of the organizational context as potential moderators of this relationship. We defined job insecurity as an additional stressor to shift work and supposed that the organizational context moderates its detrimental consequences on employees’ health. Hypotheses were tested with a survey-based cross- sectional methodology. We defined the organizational context through several working conditions: demands, control, managerial and peer support, relationships, role and change. The HSE Management Standards Analysis Tool, 4-item job insecurity scale and Subjective Health Questionnaire SF-36 were applied to a convenience sample of 641 manufacturing shift workers of various age, gender and organizational tenure, employed in three Croatian factories. The hypotheses were generally supported: job insecurity predicted lower levels of workers’ self-reported physical, psychological and general health while a beneficial organizational context buffered this negative relationship. However, night work and job insecurity did not explain individual differences in health. The convenience sample and cross- sectional methodology limit the interpretations of the findings, especially their generalizability, as well as the possibility of causal inferences about the tested relationships. The study identifies several organizational factors as buffers of detrimental consequences of job insecurity among manufacturing workers which have been recognized as a vulnerable labour force. The study contributes to previous knowledge with some valuable insights on the impact of job insecurity among highly demanding blue-collar jobs.

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