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Cibalae/Vinkovci during Late Antiquity (fifth to sixth century AD) – new insights about old assumptions / Rapan Papeša, Anita ; Roksandić, Danijela.

By: Rapan Papeša, Anita.
Contributor(s): Roksandić, Danijela [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2016Description: 145-161 str.Other title: Cibalae/Vinkovci during Late Antiquity (fifth to sixth century AD) – new insights about old assumptions [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.07 | Cibalae, Late Roman, pottery | Cibalae, Late Roman, pottery In: Forschungen zu Spätantike und Mittelalter, Band 4 str. 145-161Summary: This article presents the current state of archaeological research in the Roman city of Cibalae in Pan-nonia, present-day Vinkovci (Croatia), during the fifth and sixth centuries AD, based on burials, set-tlement features and pottery production. In Croatian archaeology and historiography the notion that the Roman city of Cibalae was completely burnt down and destroyed at the end of the fourth century has become the norm from the nineteenth century onwards. A re-evaluation of old finds and records, combined with the results obtained by new archaeological excavations, has changed this perception. These results now show that life in Cibalae continued well into the sixth century AD. This period is of particular interest because the finds and features indicate that Late Antique structures were well used by the local Roman population as well as by new, barbarian settlers. The Roman ceramic workshops continued production and produced new shapes during the fifth and sixth centuries AD
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This article presents the current state of archaeological research in the Roman city of Cibalae in Pan-nonia, present-day Vinkovci (Croatia), during the fifth and sixth centuries AD, based on burials, set-tlement features and pottery production. In Croatian archaeology and historiography the notion that the Roman city of Cibalae was completely burnt down and destroyed at the end of the fourth century has become the norm from the nineteenth century onwards. A re-evaluation of old finds and records, combined with the results obtained by new archaeological excavations, has changed this perception. These results now show that life in Cibalae continued well into the sixth century AD. This period is of particular interest because the finds and features indicate that Late Antique structures were well used by the local Roman population as well as by new, barbarian settlers. The Roman ceramic workshops continued production and produced new shapes during the fifth and sixth centuries AD

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