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Borderlands and Transborder Regions of the Croatian Language: How Far Back in History is Enough? / Peti-Stantić, Anita ; Langston, Keith.

By: Peti-Stantić, Anita.
Contributor(s): Langston, Keith [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2016Description: 309-329 str.Other title: Borderlands and Transborder Regions of the Croatian Language: How Far Back in History is Enough? [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.03 | Borders, Transborder Regions, Croatian Language, Speech Community, Standard Language | Borders, Transborder Regions, Croatian Language, Speech Community, Standard LanguageOnline resources: Click here to access online In: The Palgrave Handbook of Slavic Languages, Identities and Borders str. 309-329Summary: Croatia has traditionally been seen as a border region. It is situated at the intersection of Central Europe, Mediterranean Europe, and the Balkans, and from different perspectives an be considered to belong to all three regions. In treating language as an instrument, we combine the view of language as an instrument of human thought and as an instrument of the human capacity to communicate, and, thereby, to create communities. We focus above all on the interpretation of different types of language communities in the South Slavic lands, stressing especially the contacts and conflicts among them, as well as the spatial and social overlapping of these communities. When we consider the borders that have been used to define the Croatian language, it is clear that we are dealing with the intersection of two spaces whose borders in many situations do not coincide: the communicative space and the symbolic space. Both of these spaces, of course, have existed throughout history, although they have been prioritized differently at various times.
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Croatia has traditionally been seen as a border region. It is situated at the intersection of Central Europe, Mediterranean Europe, and the Balkans, and from different perspectives an be considered to belong to all three regions. In treating language as an instrument, we combine the view of language as an instrument of human thought and as an instrument of the human capacity to communicate, and, thereby, to create communities. We focus above all on the interpretation of different types of language communities in the South Slavic lands, stressing especially the contacts and conflicts among them, as well as the spatial and social overlapping of these communities. When we consider the borders that have been used to define the Croatian language, it is clear that we are dealing with the intersection of two spaces whose borders in many situations do not coincide: the communicative space and the symbolic space. Both of these spaces, of course, have existed throughout history, although they have been prioritized differently at various times.

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