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The Sinful Woman: the Perception of Sin in the Modern Age / Janja Čulig.

By: Čulig, Janja.
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2017Description: str.Other title: The Sinful Woman: the Perception of Sin in the Modern Age [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.10 | sin, visual art, diachrony, image schema | sin, visual art, diachrony, image schema In: 4th Croatian International Conference of English Studies: Words and Images. Skup: Split, Hrvatska, 24.-25.11.2017Summary: The article deals with the perception of sin and temptation as a female figure, both in textual and visual imagery. Starting with The Bible and its presentation of the Original Sin as Eve, it examines how the perception of sin evolved through the Modern Age, following notable written material and visual art. Dante's Purgatory is taken as a prominent example of the perception of sin in literature, while Pieter Bruegel the Elder's engravings are taken as an example of the visual presentation of the subject. The article follows this set trail of female representations as the embodiment of sin to the comic book world of Dylan Dog, where, again, the woman is used as a marker for sin, temptation and danger. The article tries to show how the centuries' old pattern of presenting sin in both text and image is tied to its conceptualization as being female, and dangerously so, as inherent to women. The diachronic overview of visual and textual representations is presented through the theory of image schemas (Lakoff, 1987 ; Johnson, 1987), frame theory (Lakoff 1993, 2004), and Fillmore’s frame semantics. The goal of the article is to present a view of the human creative output as a valuable and versatile array of symbolic communication that can tell us a lot about why we see the world as we do, and perhaps how we can strive to change it for the better.
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The article deals with the perception of sin and temptation as a female figure, both in textual and visual imagery. Starting with The Bible and its presentation of the Original Sin as Eve, it examines how the perception of sin evolved through the Modern Age, following notable written material and visual art. Dante's Purgatory is taken as a prominent example of the perception of sin in literature, while Pieter Bruegel the Elder's engravings are taken as an example of the visual presentation of the subject. The article follows this set trail of female representations as the embodiment of sin to the comic book world of Dylan Dog, where, again, the woman is used as a marker for sin, temptation and danger. The article tries to show how the centuries' old pattern of presenting sin in both text and image is tied to its conceptualization as being female, and dangerously so, as inherent to women. The diachronic overview of visual and textual representations is presented through the theory of image schemas (Lakoff, 1987 ; Johnson, 1987), frame theory (Lakoff 1993, 2004), and Fillmore’s frame semantics. The goal of the article is to present a view of the human creative output as a valuable and versatile array of symbolic communication that can tell us a lot about why we see the world as we do, and perhaps how we can strive to change it for the better.

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