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Primary and Secondary Experience in Developing Adaptive Information Systems Supporting Knowledge Transfer / Sergerj Lugović, Ivan Dunđer, Marko Horvat.

By: Lugović, Sergej.
Contributor(s): Dunđer, Ivan [aut] | Horvat, Marko [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 1419-1422 str.Subject(s): 2.09 | 5.04 | adaptive information systems, science 2.0, information behaviour, socio-technical systems, open innovation, information and communication sciences | adaptive information systems, science 2.0, information behaviour, socio-technical systems, open innovation, information and communication sciencesOnline resources: Click here to access online In: 40th International Convention on Information and Communication Technology, Electronics and Microelectronics MIPRO 2017 : proceedings International Convention on Information and Communication Technology, Electronics and Microelectronics - MIPRO (40 ; 2017 ; Opatija) str. 1419-1422Summary: One can evidence an increased and complex dynamic in the today's society in terms of technology that is being used, amounts of data that are being collected and processed by computers, and the resulting information overloads. The main challenge is how to address such a change with regard to the design of information systems and how those information systems are aligned with the change in human behaviour. This paper aims to address the issue of designing information systems that support Science 2.0 — a new phenomenon of interrelated socio-technical interactions in which communication is the heart of science and the environment that enables critiquing, suggesting and sharing ideas and data in real time with almost no costs. This paper underlines problems related to the institutionalisation of knowledge transfer and its weaknesses. It also pinpoints John Dewey's primary and secondary experience as a point of departure which provides theories, theoretical frameworks and models such as information behaviour, documents and communities of action, the quadruple Helix model, activity theory, evolutionary learning and knowledge sharing communities. All these can be utilised for designing adaptive information systems that support better knowledge transfer.
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One can evidence an increased and complex dynamic in the today's society in terms of technology that is being used, amounts of data that are being collected and processed by computers, and the resulting information overloads. The main challenge is how to address such a change with regard to the design of information systems and how those information systems are aligned with the change in human behaviour. This paper aims to address the issue of designing information systems that support Science 2.0 — a new phenomenon of interrelated socio-technical interactions in which communication is the heart of science and the environment that enables critiquing, suggesting and sharing ideas and data in real time with almost no costs. This paper underlines problems related to the institutionalisation of knowledge transfer and its weaknesses. It also pinpoints John Dewey's primary and secondary experience as a point of departure which provides theories, theoretical frameworks and models such as information behaviour, documents and communities of action, the quadruple Helix model, activity theory, evolutionary learning and knowledge sharing communities. All these can be utilised for designing adaptive information systems that support better knowledge transfer.

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