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Anti-immigrant prejudice after the 2015 migration wave: the interaction of political orientation, perceived threat and concept of national identity / Ajana Löw, Saša Puzić, Jelena Matić.

By: Löw, Ajana.
Contributor(s): Puzić, Saša [aut] | Matić, Jelena [aut].
Material type: materialTypeLabelArticleOther title: Anti-immigrant prejudice after the 2015 migration wave: the interaction of political orientation, perceived threat and concept of national identity [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.03 | 5.05 | 5.06 | immigrants, prejudice, political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity, migration wave | immigrants, prejudice, political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity, migration waveOnline resources: Click here to access online In: European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) General Conference Oslo, Norveška, 6. - 9. rujna 2017.Abstract: Political ideology and political orientation are, surprisingly, under- investigated concepts in research on immigration attitudes, especially in Europe (Hainmueller & Hopkins, 2014). Recent studies from US suggest that the ideology-prejudice link varies depending on contextual factors, such as concern over challenges to the in-group (national) boundaries (e.g. pronounced in-group threat or changing concept of national identity) (e.g. Lahav & Courtemanche, 2012 ; Hopkins, 2013). However, it remains unclear whether contextual factors affect only right- wing participants or have equal influence on those who are not initially anti-immigration, i.e. left-wing participants. In the context of the 2015 migration wave, this paper investigates the interaction of political orientation, perceived threat and concept of national identity in explaining anti-immigrant prejudice among Croatian youth. The study was conducted in spring 2016 on a representative sample of high- school graduates of Zagreb and its suburban area (N=1050). The questionnaire assessed political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity, cultural and religious practices and sociodemographics. When controlling for sociodemographics, participants’ political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity and cultural and religious practices explained a substantial amount of variance of anti- immigrant prejudice. Results revealed an interaction effect between perceived threat and political orientation. When perceived threat was high, there was no difference between left- wing and right-wing participants in the level of prejudice. Findings are discussed in relation to theories of prejudice that emphasize the role of concerns over potential challenges and threats to the in-group identity. The paper contributes to the existing literature by providing identity-based explanations of changes in social climate after large-scale migrations.
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Political ideology and political orientation are, surprisingly, under- investigated concepts in research on immigration attitudes, especially in Europe (Hainmueller & Hopkins, 2014). Recent studies from US suggest that the ideology-prejudice link varies depending on contextual factors, such as concern over challenges to the in-group (national) boundaries (e.g. pronounced in-group threat or changing concept of national identity) (e.g. Lahav & Courtemanche, 2012 ; Hopkins, 2013). However, it remains unclear whether contextual factors affect only right- wing participants or have equal influence on those who are not initially anti-immigration, i.e. left-wing participants. In the context of the 2015 migration wave, this paper investigates the interaction of political orientation, perceived threat and concept of national identity in explaining anti-immigrant prejudice among Croatian youth. The study was conducted in spring 2016 on a representative sample of high- school graduates of Zagreb and its suburban area (N=1050). The questionnaire assessed political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity, cultural and religious practices and sociodemographics. When controlling for sociodemographics, participants’ political orientation, perceived in-group threat, concept of national identity and cultural and religious practices explained a substantial amount of variance of anti- immigrant prejudice. Results revealed an interaction effect between perceived threat and political orientation. When perceived threat was high, there was no difference between left- wing and right-wing participants in the level of prejudice. Findings are discussed in relation to theories of prejudice that emphasize the role of concerns over potential challenges and threats to the in-group identity. The paper contributes to the existing literature by providing identity-based explanations of changes in social climate after large-scale migrations.

Projekt MZOS projekt

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