Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Forensic Archaeometry: Introducing Forensic Methods on Archaeological Materials / Hincak, Zdravka ; Špoljarić, Igor ; Bačić, Ivana ; Majstorović, Martina ; Mihelić, Damir ; Mikulka, Ana ; Mršić, Gordan.

By: Hincak, Zdravka.
Contributor(s): Špoljarić, Igor [aut] | Bačić, Ivana [aut] | Majstorović, Martina [aut] | Mihelić, Damir [aut] | Mikulka, Ana [aut] | Mršić, Gordan [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: str.Other title: Forensic Archaeometry: Introducing Forensic Methods on Archaeological Materials [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 1.02 | 1.04 | 1.05 | forensic archaeometry, XRF, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, histological methodsOnline resources: Elektronička verzija In: 6th European Meeting on Forensic Archaeology (EMFA) str. 8-9Summary: Archeometry was first to show how, and to what extent, scientific methods can solve archaeological problems. Furthermore, the use of forensic methods in archaeometry often provides unexpected data, which give a new dimension to the examined archeological case. Discovering hidden details, such as a trace of red pigment on the lesion of a 5000 years old skull, traces of tiny dust particles on a fragment of a deceased's shirt fabric, tiny fragments of degraded skin from a destroyed grave, tiny fragments of burnt bones or buckshot traces embedded into bones, indicate the justification for tighter connection between forensics and archeometry. The results of the analysis of these cases, as well as the analytical methods used (XRF, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, histological methods) are presented in detail. Forensic research methods are also spreading swiftly to other archeological materials, thereby setting new standards in archeology and approaching it partly to the exact sciences.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

Archeometry was first to show how, and to what extent, scientific methods can solve archaeological problems. Furthermore, the use of forensic methods in archaeometry often provides unexpected data, which give a new dimension to the examined archeological case. Discovering hidden details, such as a trace of red pigment on the lesion of a 5000 years old skull, traces of tiny dust particles on a fragment of a deceased's shirt fabric, tiny fragments of degraded skin from a destroyed grave, tiny fragments of burnt bones or buckshot traces embedded into bones, indicate the justification for tighter connection between forensics and archeometry. The results of the analysis of these cases, as well as the analytical methods used (XRF, Raman Spectroscopy, SEM-EDX, histological methods) are presented in detail. Forensic research methods are also spreading swiftly to other archeological materials, thereby setting new standards in archeology and approaching it partly to the exact sciences.

Projekt MZOS projekt

ENG

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//