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The end of meaning : studies in catastrophe / by Matthew Gumpert.

By: Gumpert, Matthew.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Pub., 2012Description: lxxvii, 497 str. : ilustr. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781443839150; 1443839159.Subject(s): Catastrophical, The | Catastrophical, The, in literature | Catastrophical, The, in art | Catastrophical, The, in motion pictures | katastrofičan | katastrofično u književnosti | katastrofično u umjetnosti | katastrofično na filmu
Contents:
Part one: Catastrope theory :
The accidental muse: collisions with transcendence in Ancient Greek poetry
Plague in Thebes: 'Hypersemiosis' in Sophocles' 'Oedipus Tyrannus'
Plague in Athens: 'Realsemiotik' in Thucydides' 'History of the Peloponnesian war'
The sublime catastrophe: Longinus
"Take it and read": Augustine in the garden of the sign
Walcome to the desert of the semiotic: Genesis 2-3
Part two: Writing catastrophe :
The sign is dead, long live the sign! Marie de France's 'Laüstic'
Plague in Florence: 'The Decameron'
Self, interrupted: 'Reveries of a solitary walker'
'A' is for 'ambiguity': Semiotic tyranna and dissent in Hawthorne's 'The scarlet letter'
In pursuit of the transcendental signifier. 'Moby-Dick'
The epistemology of waiting: Henry James' "The beast in the jungle"
Metaphor as illness: From 'AIDS and its metaphors' to 'Angels in America'
The rise of anti-novel: 'Left behind'; or, the tribulation of the sign.
Part three: The catastrophe of everyday life :
All that is solid melts into air: the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge
Let's talk about weather: The metaphysics of meteorology
Generic violence: Massacre at Virginia Tech
Rhetorical terrorism: notes on the hermeneutics of fear
Summary: From the poetry of classical Greece to the popular culture of contemporary America, this book seeks to show that catastrophe, precisely as the notion of the sui generis, has always been generic. To single out catastrophe as the exceptional, or the monstrous, or the modern, runs contrary to the proposition underlying the essays here.
List(s) this item appears in: Komparativna_Prinove_2018 | PDS književnost - izborni - Književnost i smisao kraja
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Bibliografija: str. 454-497

Part one: Catastrope theory :

The accidental muse: collisions with transcendence in Ancient Greek poetry

Plague in Thebes: 'Hypersemiosis' in Sophocles' 'Oedipus Tyrannus'

Plague in Athens: 'Realsemiotik' in Thucydides' 'History of the Peloponnesian war'

The sublime catastrophe: Longinus

"Take it and read": Augustine in the garden of the sign

Walcome to the desert of the semiotic: Genesis 2-3

Part two: Writing catastrophe :

The sign is dead, long live the sign! Marie de France's 'Laüstic'

Plague in Florence: 'The Decameron'

Self, interrupted: 'Reveries of a solitary walker'

'A' is for 'ambiguity': Semiotic tyranna and dissent in Hawthorne's 'The scarlet letter'

In pursuit of the transcendental signifier. 'Moby-Dick'

The epistemology of waiting: Henry James' "The beast in the jungle"

Metaphor as illness: From 'AIDS and its metaphors' to 'Angels in America'

The rise of anti-novel: 'Left behind'; or, the tribulation of the sign.

Part three: The catastrophe of everyday life :

All that is solid melts into air: the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge

Let's talk about weather: The metaphysics of meteorology

Generic violence: Massacre at Virginia Tech

Rhetorical terrorism: notes on the hermeneutics of fear

From the poetry of classical Greece to the popular culture of contemporary America, this book seeks to show that catastrophe, precisely as the notion of the sui generis, has always been generic. To single out catastrophe as the exceptional, or the monstrous, or the modern, runs contrary to the proposition underlying the essays here.

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