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Romantic Consciousness as Spiritual Capitalism / Martina Domines Veliki.

By: Domines Veliki, Martina.
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: str.Other title: Romantic Consciousness as Spiritual Capitalism [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): Romantic consciousness, Wordsworth, Shelley, capitalism eng In: 2nd CounterText Conference. University of Malta, Malta, 6-8 April 2018Summary: Romanticism has always been regarded as a special world view grounded in the criticism of ‘modernity’ understood as ‘the encompassing, multifaceted civilization that develops in conjunction with capitalism’ (Sayre and Lowy). Wordsworth and Shelley have in their turn been viewed as major Romantic poets who turned against the ethos of modern industrial capitalism despising the rising bourgeoisie which they saw as the embodiment of rationalization, self-centered individualism, alienation and urbanization. However, by the close-readings of Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey and Shelley’s Mont Blanc, this paper will argue that both poets develop a kind of spiritual capitalism in their pursuit of the private self, by cultivating solitude as a space for consciousness (Ferguson). In this pursuit both poets anthropomorphize the natural world and validate the inhuman rather than human thus displaying the very logic of capitalist production where individual ambition fears the pressures of a competing consciousness and is therefore experienced in competition against other human beings.
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Romanticism has always been regarded as a special world view grounded in the criticism of ‘modernity’ understood as ‘the encompassing, multifaceted civilization that develops in conjunction with capitalism’ (Sayre and Lowy). Wordsworth and Shelley have in their turn been viewed as major Romantic poets who turned against the ethos of modern industrial capitalism despising the rising bourgeoisie which they saw as the embodiment of rationalization, self-centered individualism, alienation and urbanization. However, by the close-readings of Wordsworth’s Tintern Abbey and Shelley’s Mont Blanc, this paper will argue that both poets develop a kind of spiritual capitalism in their pursuit of the private self, by cultivating solitude as a space for consciousness (Ferguson). In this pursuit both poets anthropomorphize the natural world and validate the inhuman rather than human thus displaying the very logic of capitalist production where individual ambition fears the pressures of a competing consciousness and is therefore experienced in competition against other human beings.

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