Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Authority as Poverty and the Victorian Novel / Tatjana Jukić.

By: Jukić, Tatjana.
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2018Description: str.Other title: Authority as Poverty and the Victorian Novel [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.03 | authority, poverty, the novel, Victorian literature, psychoanalysis, Elizabeth Gaskell | authority, poverty, the novel, Victorian literature, psychoanalysis, Elizabeth Gaskell In: 14th ESSE Conference. Brno, Češka, 29.08-02.09.2018Summary: There is a relation of authority to poverty in the Victorian novel that informs the very rationality of its narration: narrative coherence is secured by a sense of authority, overlapping or not with the narrator or the focalizing consciousness, that seems invested with poverty, as if to suggest that poverty secures authority similarly to how authority secures narrative coherence. This is not to say that narrative authority resides with the poor in these novels ; rather, authority aspires to an emancipation from wealth and its concerns—the poor in this equation fail to coincide with authority insofar as they may aspire uncritically to wealth. In my presentation I propose to analyze how this Victorian conjuncture anticipates psychoanalysis, especially Freud’s ideation of masochism (indeed, Freud, a discerning reader of Victorian fiction, first addresses masochism as an economic problem, to then explain it around the death drive) ; also, I would like to show how the Victorian novel anticipates a critique of Freudian positions. My point of departure will be the work of Elizabeth Gaskell, with the inflection it seeks in Charles Dickens and Charlotte Brontë.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
No physical items for this record

There is a relation of authority to poverty in the Victorian novel that informs the very rationality of its narration: narrative coherence is secured by a sense of authority, overlapping or not with the narrator or the focalizing consciousness, that seems invested with poverty, as if to suggest that poverty secures authority similarly to how authority secures narrative coherence. This is not to say that narrative authority resides with the poor in these novels ; rather, authority aspires to an emancipation from wealth and its concerns—the poor in this equation fail to coincide with authority insofar as they may aspire uncritically to wealth. In my presentation I propose to analyze how this Victorian conjuncture anticipates psychoanalysis, especially Freud’s ideation of masochism (indeed, Freud, a discerning reader of Victorian fiction, first addresses masochism as an economic problem, to then explain it around the death drive) ; also, I would like to show how the Victorian novel anticipates a critique of Freudian positions. My point of departure will be the work of Elizabeth Gaskell, with the inflection it seeks in Charles Dickens and Charlotte Brontë.

Projekt MZOS projekt

ENG

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//