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Translation as a tool in LSP teaching / Nataša Pavlović.

By: Pavlović, Nataša.
Material type: ArticleArticlePublisher: 2018Description: --- str.Other title: Translation as a tool in LSP teaching [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.03 | 8.05 | pedagogical translation, second language teaching, language for special purposes, LSP | pedagogical translation, second language teaching, language for special purposes, LSP In: Od teorije do prakse u jeziku struke. Zagreb, Hrvatska, 22-24.02.2018 str. ---Summary: As a backlash against the now infamous “grammar translation method”, translation was neglected or even actively discouraged in second/foreign language (L2) teaching for over a century. Attempts at its rehabilitation, which began timidly with Alan Duff’s 1989 book Translation, grew more assertive during the 1990 (e.g. Stibbard 1994 ; Malmkjær 1998, etc.). The first two decades of the 21st century have seen an explosion in the number of books and articles dealing with what some authors call “pedagogical translation” (Klaudy 2003 ; Leonardi 2010). The latter term, defined as “an instrumental kind of translation [which] serves as a tool of improving [...] foreign language proficiency” (Vermes 2010), can be distinguished from professional translation on the one hand, and from the use of translation in the training of future translators on the other. Despite the renewed interest in translation as a “fifth skill” in L2 teaching (Butzkamm & Caldwell 2009), not much attention has been devoted to its specific use in the teaching of languages for special purposes (LSPs). LSP, which can be defined as “a formalized and codified variety of language, used for special purposes, with the function of communicating information of a specialist nature” (Picht & Draskau 1985), is often taught to large, heterogeneous groups of students, with varying degrees of L2 competence, background knowledge and learning motivation (Papić Bogadi 2016), particularly in higher education contexts. To overcome these and other challenges, LSP teachers are constantly seeking new ideas on how to help their students achieve the highest possible learning outcomes in the short time they have at their disposal. In this talk, I wish to argue that translation, without purporting to replace all other instructional methods and activities, can be profitably used to enrich LSP instruction and motivate students. I would like to open up a space for discussion and exchange of ideas about the role of translation in LSP classes, looking more closely at its advantages, disadvantages and possible pitfalls. Various types of translation-related activities will be presented, with particular emphasis on realistic situations and authentic materials. Some insights from Translation Studies will be shared, together with tips on how to incorporate them in the teaching of LSP.
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As a backlash against the now infamous “grammar translation method”, translation was neglected or even actively discouraged in second/foreign language (L2) teaching for over a century. Attempts at its rehabilitation, which began timidly with Alan Duff’s 1989 book Translation, grew more assertive during the 1990 (e.g. Stibbard 1994 ; Malmkjær 1998, etc.). The first two decades of the 21st century have seen an explosion in the number of books and articles dealing with what some authors call “pedagogical translation” (Klaudy 2003 ; Leonardi 2010). The latter term, defined as “an instrumental kind of translation [which] serves as a tool of improving [...] foreign language proficiency” (Vermes 2010), can be distinguished from professional translation on the one hand, and from the use of translation in the training of future translators on the other. Despite the renewed interest in translation as a “fifth skill” in L2 teaching (Butzkamm & Caldwell 2009), not much attention has been devoted to its specific use in the teaching of languages for special purposes (LSPs). LSP, which can be defined as “a formalized and codified variety of language, used for special purposes, with the function of communicating information of a specialist nature” (Picht & Draskau 1985), is often taught to large, heterogeneous groups of students, with varying degrees of L2 competence, background knowledge and learning motivation (Papić Bogadi 2016), particularly in higher education contexts. To overcome these and other challenges, LSP teachers are constantly seeking new ideas on how to help their students achieve the highest possible learning outcomes in the short time they have at their disposal. In this talk, I wish to argue that translation, without purporting to replace all other instructional methods and activities, can be profitably used to enrich LSP instruction and motivate students. I would like to open up a space for discussion and exchange of ideas about the role of translation in LSP classes, looking more closely at its advantages, disadvantages and possible pitfalls. Various types of translation-related activities will be presented, with particular emphasis on realistic situations and authentic materials. Some insights from Translation Studies will be shared, together with tips on how to incorporate them in the teaching of LSP.

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