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Implicit power motive assessment: fakeability and predictive validity of the Conditional Reasoning Test for Power / Zvonimir Galić, Mitja Ružojčić, Nataša Trojak, Lucija Zeljko.

By: Galić, Zvonimir.
Contributor(s): Ružojčić, Mitja [aut] | Trojak, Nataša [aut] | Zeljko, Lucija [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 1-1 str.Other title: Implicit power motive assessment: Fakeability and predictive validity of the Conditional Reasoning Test for Power [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | none | none In: ENESER 2018: EAWOP Small Group Meeting on Recent Developments in Recruitment and Selection str. 1-1Summary: Purpose/contribution The conditional reasoning approach has been identified as one of the most promising approaches to the implicit personality assessment (Sackett et al., 2017). It has been successfully used for the measurement of achievement motive (James, 1998), motive to aggress (James & LeBreton, 2010), and creativity (Schoen, Bowler, & Schilpzand, 2016). Recently, the conditional reasoning paradigm has also been applied to assess power motive - the tendency to influence, direct and guide others (James et al, 2013 ; James & Meyer, 2012). Given that the power motive reflects in a strong desire to lead others, it can be considered a prerequisite of successful leadership (Chan & Drasgow, 2001 ; McClelland, 1992). Still, the Conditional Reasoning Test for Power (CRT-P) represents a work-in- progress, and the test’s use would not be justified without additional evidences about its validity. In this paper, we report the findings of four studies where we explored potential usefulness of the CRT-P for personnel selection. Design/methodology In Studies 1 and 2 we tested the implicit nature and fakeability of the CRT-P. In both studies, using a within-sample design, we compared the CRT-P and self-report personality measures between honest responding and a simulated selection. In Study 1, we compared the scores on the CRT-P and two self-report measures of the power motive between honest responding and a simulated selection for a middle management position on a sample of psychology students (n1 = 66). In Study 2, on another sample of students (n2 = 29) we compared responses and recorded eye-movement data using an eye-tracking device on the CRT-P, a self-report power motive measure, and a social desirability scale between the same two situations. In Studies 3a and 3b, using cross- sectional on-line surveys on large samples of employees (n3a = 185 ; n3b = 160), we tested if the CRT-P scores predict occupancy of a management position. Results Both faking studies indicated that the CRT-P is less fakeable than „ordinary“ self-report personality measures, while the eye-movement data were consistent with the idea that the CRT-P and self-report measures capture different psychological processes. Finally, in Studies 3a and 3b we demonstrated that CRT-P score predicts occupancy of an organizational leadership position. Limitations Although the CRT-P seems as a useful measure, some of its psychometric properties, such as internal consistency, are less than perfect. Additionally, this study is conducted in a specific cultural context and its findings should be cross-validated elsewhere. Implications Our results indicated that the CRT-P seems to be a psychometrically valid measure of the implicit power motive, potentially useful for scientific and practical purposes. Originality/value Apart from the studies that reported preliminary validity of the CRT-P (James et al, 2013 ; James & Meyer, 2012), to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explored the validity of the CRT-P.
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Purpose/contribution The conditional reasoning approach has been identified as one of the most promising approaches to the implicit personality assessment (Sackett et al., 2017). It has been successfully used for the measurement of achievement motive (James, 1998), motive to aggress (James & LeBreton, 2010), and creativity (Schoen, Bowler, & Schilpzand, 2016). Recently, the conditional reasoning paradigm has also been applied to assess power motive - the tendency to influence, direct and guide others (James et al, 2013 ; James & Meyer, 2012). Given that the power motive reflects in a strong desire to lead others, it can be considered a prerequisite of successful leadership (Chan & Drasgow, 2001 ; McClelland, 1992). Still, the Conditional Reasoning Test for Power (CRT-P) represents a work-in- progress, and the test’s use would not be justified without additional evidences about its validity. In this paper, we report the findings of four studies where we explored potential usefulness of the CRT-P for personnel selection. Design/methodology In Studies 1 and 2 we tested the implicit nature and fakeability of the CRT-P. In both studies, using a within-sample design, we compared the CRT-P and self-report personality measures between honest responding and a simulated selection. In Study 1, we compared the scores on the CRT-P and two self-report measures of the power motive between honest responding and a simulated selection for a middle management position on a sample of psychology students (n1 = 66). In Study 2, on another sample of students (n2 = 29) we compared responses and recorded eye-movement data using an eye-tracking device on the CRT-P, a self-report power motive measure, and a social desirability scale between the same two situations. In Studies 3a and 3b, using cross- sectional on-line surveys on large samples of employees (n3a = 185 ; n3b = 160), we tested if the CRT-P scores predict occupancy of a management position. Results Both faking studies indicated that the CRT-P is less fakeable than „ordinary“ self-report personality measures, while the eye-movement data were consistent with the idea that the CRT-P and self-report measures capture different psychological processes. Finally, in Studies 3a and 3b we demonstrated that CRT-P score predicts occupancy of an organizational leadership position. Limitations Although the CRT-P seems as a useful measure, some of its psychometric properties, such as internal consistency, are less than perfect. Additionally, this study is conducted in a specific cultural context and its findings should be cross-validated elsewhere. Implications Our results indicated that the CRT-P seems to be a psychometrically valid measure of the implicit power motive, potentially useful for scientific and practical purposes. Originality/value Apart from the studies that reported preliminary validity of the CRT-P (James et al, 2013 ; James & Meyer, 2012), to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that explored the validity of the CRT-P.

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