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Disentangling the relationship between implicit aggressiveness and counterproductive work behaviors: the role of job attitudes / Zvonimir Galić, Mitja Ružojčić, Željko Jerneić, Maša Tonković Grabovac.

By: Galić, Zvonimir.
Contributor(s): Ružojčić, Mitja [aut] | Jerneić, Željko [aut] | Tonković Grabovac, Maša [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 77-96 str.Other title: Disentangling the Relationship Between Implicit Aggressiveness and Counterproductive Work Behaviors: The Role of Job Attitudes [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.06 | implicit aggressiveness ; the Conditional Reasoning Test for Aggression ; counterproductive work behaviors ; job attitudes | implicit aggressiveness ; the Conditional Reasoning Test for Aggression ; counterproductive work behaviors ; job attitudesOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Human performance 31 (2018), 2 ; str. 77-96Abstract: Implicit aggressiveness, measured by the Conditional Reasoning Test for Aggression (CRT- A), has been shown to be important for understanding counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs). However, it is not clear how employees justify CWBs that stem from their unconscious tendencies. We tested the idea that implicitly aggressive individuals develop negative job attitudes (JAs) to justify their CWBs. In Study 1, 333 employees completed the CRT-A, a battery of JAs, and a CWBs scale. In Study 2, another sample (n = 341) completed the CRT-A and different measures of JAs and CWBs. In both studies, implicit aggressiveness explained JAs and self-reported CWBs. Although the design did not allow establishment of exact causal sequence, both studies were more consistent with the model where CWBs mediated the CRT-A and JA relationship.
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Implicit aggressiveness, measured by the Conditional Reasoning Test for Aggression (CRT- A), has been shown to be important for understanding counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs). However, it is not clear how employees justify CWBs that stem from their unconscious tendencies. We tested the idea that implicitly aggressive individuals develop negative job attitudes (JAs) to justify their CWBs. In Study 1, 333 employees completed the CRT-A, a battery of JAs, and a CWBs scale. In Study 2, another sample (n = 341) completed the CRT-A and different measures of JAs and CWBs. In both studies, implicit aggressiveness explained JAs and self-reported CWBs. Although the design did not allow establishment of exact causal sequence, both studies were more consistent with the model where CWBs mediated the CRT-A and JA relationship.

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