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Psychological climate and perceived employability: accounting for the effects of occupational self-efficacy / Jasmina Tomas, Darja Maslić Seršić, Hans De Witte.

By: Tomas, Jasmina.
Contributor(s): Maslić Seršić, Darja [aut] | De Witte, Hans [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleSubject(s): Perceived employability, psychological climate, occupational self-efficacy, private sector, white-collars eng In: 23. Dani Ramira i Zorana Bujasa - Knjiga sažetaka / Arambašić, Lidija ; Erceg, Inja ; Kamenov, ŽeljkaAbstract: The present study probes the effects of psychological climate on perceived employability (PE) accounting for occupational self-efficacy. PE–i.e., the subjectively assessed probability of obtaining new employment, either within the internal (i.e., internal PE) or external labour market (i.e., external PE)–has been recognized as a critical personal resource for successful coping with the challenges of the contemporary labour market. Although much is known on its beneficial effects for employees’ well-being, the knowledge on the antecedents of PE is still relatively scarce. In response, we focus on work environmental resources summarized in the ‘psychological climate’, a molar construct that comprises three higher-order latent factors: job challenge and variety, role stress and lack of harmony and co-workers’ cooperation. Departing from the Conservation of Resources Theory, we propose that resourceful work environment will positively relate to both internal and external PE due to its positive effects on occupational self-efficacy, i.e., employee’s beliefs in his/her abilities to successfully master job-related challenges. Hypotheses on this mediational model were tested among 2195 white-collar employees from the private sector working full-time for a minimum of six months in their current organization. Participants completed an on-line questionnaire comprising of internationally validated self-report measures with sound psychometric properties. Results are based on structural equation modelling (SEM). As hypothesized, the psychological climate dimensions positively predicted both internal and external PE, effects that were partially mediated by occupational self-efficacy. Although the cross-sectional design limits the possibility of drawing causal inferences, the present study demonstrates which elements of one’s work environment may positively contribute to PE, an insight that both employees and organizations could benefit from.
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The present study probes the effects of psychological climate on perceived employability (PE) accounting for occupational self-efficacy. PE–i.e., the subjectively assessed probability of obtaining new employment, either within the internal (i.e., internal PE) or external labour market (i.e., external PE)–has been recognized as a critical personal resource for successful coping with the challenges of the contemporary labour market. Although much is known on its beneficial effects for employees’ well-being, the knowledge on the antecedents of PE is still relatively scarce. In response, we focus on work environmental resources summarized in the ‘psychological climate’, a molar construct that comprises three higher-order latent factors: job challenge and variety, role stress and lack of harmony and co-workers’ cooperation. Departing from the Conservation of Resources Theory, we propose that resourceful work environment will positively relate to both internal and external PE due to its positive effects on occupational self-efficacy, i.e., employee’s beliefs in his/her abilities to successfully master job-related challenges. Hypotheses on this mediational model were tested among 2195 white-collar employees from the private sector working full-time for a minimum of six months in their current organization. Participants completed an on-line questionnaire comprising of internationally validated self-report measures with sound psychometric properties. Results are based on structural equation modelling (SEM). As hypothesized, the psychological climate dimensions positively predicted both internal and external PE, effects that were partially mediated by occupational self-efficacy. Although the cross-sectional design limits the possibility of drawing causal inferences, the present study demonstrates which elements of one’s work environment may positively contribute to PE, an insight that both employees and organizations could benefit from.

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