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A new attempt at interpreting arrowheads from the Roman legionary fortresses Burnum and Tilurium in Dalmatia / Sanader, Mirjana ; Zaninović, Joško ; Vukov, Mirna.

By: Sanader, Mirjana.
Contributor(s): Zaninović, Joško [aut] | Vukov, Mirna [aut].
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: str.Other title: A new attempt at interpreting arrowheads from the Roman legionary fortresses Burnum and Tilurium in Dalmatia [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 6.07 | Dalmatia, roman army, arrowheads | Dalmatia, roman army, arrowheads In: 24. International Limes Congress, Serbia str. 76-76Summary: The arrowhead is the most important part of the arrow because its shape can reveal its purpose. The authors of this paper will try to answer whether the trilobate arrowheads found during the archaeological research of the Roman legionary fortress Burnum and Tilurium were also used for wildlife hunting. Namely, the uncovered trilobate arrowheads suggest not only that their shape was designed to cut through as much body tissue as possible, but they may have also caused unusually painful wounds when attempting to remove them from the body. Consequently, such arrowheads could have been used successfully for hunting game. The authors were inspired to write this article not only by the shape of the discovered arrowheads but also by the remains of the amphitheatre and wild animal bones found in Burnum and Tilurium as well as by epigraphic sources referring to soldiers as hunters.
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The arrowhead is the most important part of the arrow because its shape can reveal its purpose. The authors of this paper will try to answer whether the trilobate arrowheads found during the archaeological research of the Roman legionary fortress Burnum and Tilurium were also used for wildlife hunting. Namely, the uncovered trilobate arrowheads suggest not only that their shape was designed to cut through as much body tissue as possible, but they may have also caused unusually painful wounds when attempting to remove them from the body. Consequently, such arrowheads could have been used successfully for hunting game. The authors were inspired to write this article not only by the shape of the discovered arrowheads but also by the remains of the amphitheatre and wild animal bones found in Burnum and Tilurium as well as by epigraphic sources referring to soldiers as hunters.

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