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Living vnye: The example of Bulat Okudzhava’s and Vladimir Vysotskii’s avtorskaia pesnia / Lugarić Vukas, Danijela.

By: Lugarić Vukas, Danijela.
Material type: ArticleArticleDescription: 20-31 str.Other title: Living vnye: The example of Bulat Okudzhava’s and Vladimir Vysotskii’s avtorskaia pesnia [Naslov na engleskom:].Subject(s): 5.05 | 6.03 | avtorskaia pesnia ; late Soviet socialism ; Okudzhava ; Vysotsky | avtorskaia pesnia ; late Soviet socialism ; Okudzhava ; VysotskyOnline resources: Elektronička verzija | Elektronička verzija In: Euxeinos. Culture and Governance in the Black Sea Region 8 (2018), 25-26 ; str. 20-31Summary: In the period after Stalin's death and the breakdown of the monolithic dogma of Socialist realism, the most exciting cultural practices were associated with three cults: the cults of youth, individualism and westernness. In the following period of Stagnation (zastoi) and Brezhnev's less liberal political doctrine, the process of cultural disintegration was even intensified. Avtorskaia pesnia (literally “author’s song”) responded ideally to the zeitgeist. It was not only close to individualism, youth culture and student population, but also to the process of cultural disintegration. Avtorskaia pesnia is sometimes called the poetry of wild youth. Emerging as a temporary autonomous zone (cf. Hakim Bey), as part of the so-called apartment culture or the institution of communal art, it is related to the phenomenon of magnitizdat. It directly influenced the development of Russian rock music - it is argued that this is one of the reasons why text dominates over music in Russian rock - and poetry in general. In the period of late Soviet socialism it was probably the most attractive and the most widespread form of cultural production and consumption. In this paper, I will analyze avtorskaia pesnia as a deterritorializing milieu (A. Yurchak) par excellence. In order to address the question of whether Soviet culture was homogeneous or heterogeneous during the Brezhnev era, I will also do a close reading of the poetry of two prominent Russian bards, B. Okudzhava and V. Vysotskii, paying special attention to one of the most authoritative Soviet cultural myths and ideologems, that of “motherland” (rodina).
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In the period after Stalin's death and the breakdown of the monolithic dogma of Socialist realism, the most exciting cultural practices were associated with three cults: the cults of youth, individualism and westernness. In the following period of Stagnation (zastoi) and Brezhnev's less liberal political doctrine, the process of cultural disintegration was even intensified. Avtorskaia pesnia (literally “author’s song”) responded ideally to the zeitgeist. It was not only close to individualism, youth culture and student population, but also to the process of cultural disintegration. Avtorskaia pesnia is sometimes called the poetry of wild youth. Emerging as a temporary autonomous zone (cf. Hakim Bey), as part of the so-called apartment culture or the institution of communal art, it is related to the phenomenon of magnitizdat. It directly influenced the development of Russian rock music - it is argued that this is one of the reasons why text dominates over music in Russian rock - and poetry in general. In the period of late Soviet socialism it was probably the most attractive and the most widespread form of cultural production and consumption. In this paper, I will analyze avtorskaia pesnia as a deterritorializing milieu (A. Yurchak) par excellence. In order to address the question of whether Soviet culture was homogeneous or heterogeneous during the Brezhnev era, I will also do a close reading of the poetry of two prominent Russian bards, B. Okudzhava and V. Vysotskii, paying special attention to one of the most authoritative Soviet cultural myths and ideologems, that of “motherland” (rodina).

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