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A Rasa reader : classical Indian aesthetics / translated and edtied by Sheldon Pollock.

By: Pollock, Sheldon [aut].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Historical sourcebooks in Classical Indian thought.Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, 2018Description: xxiv, 472 str. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 9780231173919.Subject(s): indijska estetika rasa | teorija rase - radovi do 1800 | sanskrtska književnost - estetika
Contents:
Introduction: An intellectual history of Rasa
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐎𝐧𝐞: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭, 𝐜. 𝟑𝟎𝟎, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝟔𝟓𝟎-𝟏𝟎𝟐𝟓
1. The basis Rasa theory in drama: 'Treatise on drama' of Baharata (c. 300)
2. Rasa as a figure of speech in narrative poety: The early views: 'Ornament of poetry' of Bhamaha (c. 650) ; 'Looking glass of poetry' of Dandin (c. 700) with the commentaries 'Ratna's glory' of Ratnashrijnana (c. 950) and 'Guarding the tradition' of Vadijanghala (c.950)
3. Rasa as a figure of speech: the late view : 'Essential compendium of the ornament of poetry' of Udbhata (c. 800) with the 'Brief elucidation' of Pratiharenduraja (c. 900) and the 'Exegesis' of Tilaka (c. 1100)
4. Rasa as the cahracher's emotion, and how we know it : * Commentary on the 'Treatise on drama', of Bhatta Lollata (c. 825) ; * Commentary of the 'Treatise on drama', of Shri Shankuka (c. 850)
5. There are no rules for the number of rasas : 'Ornament of poetry' of Rudrata (c.850) with 'Notes' of Namisadhu (1068)
6. Rasa cannot be expressed or implied, only "manifested" : 'Light on implicature' of Anandavardhana (c.875)
7. Rasa cannot be a figure of speech; It is what figures of speech ornament : 'The vital force of literary language' of Kuntaka (c.975)
8. There can be no "manifestation" of rasa : 'Analysis of "Manifestation"' of Mahima Bhatta (c.1025)
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐰𝐨: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐡𝐨𝐣𝐚 𝟏𝟎𝟐𝟓-𝟏𝟎𝟓𝟓
1. One rasa underlines all multiplicity : 'Neklace for the goddes of language' of Bhoja (c.1025) with the 'Commentary' of Bhatta Narasimha (undated)
2. One rasa underlines all multiplicity: The late statements : 'Light on passion' of 'Bhoja' (c.1050)
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐞: 𝐀𝐧 𝐚𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝟗𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟎𝟎𝟎
1. From rasa in the text to rasa in the reader: core idas
...
2. From rasa in the text to rasa in the reader: elaboration
...
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐅𝐨𝐮𝐫: 𝐀𝐛𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐠𝐮𝐩𝐭𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥, 𝟏𝟎𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎
1. Rasa and the critique of imitation
...
2. The theory of rasa purified
...
3. Potential flaws of rasa
...
4. The purified theory in abstract
...
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐅𝐢𝐯𝐞: 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐊𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐢𝐫, 𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟒𝟎𝟎
1. Where is rasa? Is rasa always pleasurable?
...
2. A philosophical précis of the rasa problematic
...
3. Rethinking "Semblance of rasa"
...
𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐒𝐢𝐱: 𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐚 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐌𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝, 𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟔𝟓𝟎
1. A reader reading for rasa
...
2. A poet writing of rasa
...
3. Devotees experiencing rasa
...
4. Vedanticizing Rasa
English-Sanskrit glossary
Summary: From the early years of the Common Era to 1700, Indian intellectuals explored with unparalleled subtlety the place of emotion in art. Their investigations led to the deconstruction of art's formal structures and broader inquiries into the pleasure of tragic tales. Rasa, or taste, was the word they chose to describe art's aesthetics, and their passionate effort to pin down these phenomena became its own remarkable act of creation. This book is the first in any language to follow the evolution of rasa from its origins in dramaturgical thought―a concept for the stage―to its flourishing in literary thought―a concept for the page. A Rasa Reader incorporates primary texts by every significant thinker on classical Indian aesthetics, many never translated before. The arrangement of the selections captures the intellectual dynamism that has powered this debate for centuries. Headnotes explain the meaning and significance of each text, a comprehensive introduction summarizes major threads in intellectual-historical terms, and critical endnotes and an extensive bibliography add further depth to the selections. The Sanskrit theory of emotion in art is one of the most sophisticated in the ancient world, a precursor of the work being done today by critics and philosophers of aesthetics. A Rasa Reader's conceptual detail, historical precision, and clarity will appeal to any scholar interested in a full portrait of global intellectual development. A Rasa Reader is the inaugural book in the Historical Sourcebooks in Classical Indian Thought series, edited by Sheldon Pollock. These text-based books guide readers through the most important forms of classical Indian thought, from epistemology, rhetoric, and hermeneutics to astral science, yoga, and medicine. Each volume provides fresh translations of key works, headnotes to contextualize selections, a comprehensive analysis of major lines of development within the discipline, and exegetical and text-critical endnotes, as well as a bibliography. Designed for comparativists and interested general readers, Historical Sourcebooks is also a great resource for advanced scholars seeking authoritative commentary on challenging works.
List(s) this item appears in: Komparativna_prinove_2019
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Knjiga Knjiga Knjižnica FFZG
4. kat, komparativna književnost
Komparativna književnost EC17.1 RASA (Browse shelf) Available 1305261716
Total holds: 0

Bibligorafija: str. 421-430. - Kazalo

Introduction: An intellectual history of Rasa

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐎𝐧𝐞: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐟𝐨𝐮𝐧𝐝𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧𝐚𝐥 𝐭𝐞𝐱𝐭, 𝐜. 𝟑𝟎𝟎, 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐞𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐨𝐫𝐢𝐬𝐭𝐬, 𝟔𝟓𝟎-𝟏𝟎𝟐𝟓

1. The basis Rasa theory in drama: 'Treatise on drama' of Baharata (c. 300)

2. Rasa as a figure of speech in narrative poety: The early views: 'Ornament of poetry' of Bhamaha (c. 650) ; 'Looking glass of poetry' of Dandin (c. 700) with the commentaries 'Ratna's glory' of Ratnashrijnana (c. 950) and 'Guarding the tradition' of Vadijanghala (c.950)

3. Rasa as a figure of speech: the late view : 'Essential compendium of the ornament of poetry' of Udbhata (c. 800) with the 'Brief elucidation' of Pratiharenduraja (c. 900) and the 'Exegesis' of Tilaka (c. 1100)

4. Rasa as the cahracher's emotion, and how we know it : * Commentary on the 'Treatise on drama', of Bhatta Lollata (c. 825) ; * Commentary of the 'Treatise on drama', of Shri Shankuka (c. 850)

5. There are no rules for the number of rasas : 'Ornament of poetry' of Rudrata (c.850) with 'Notes' of Namisadhu (1068)

6. Rasa cannot be expressed or implied, only "manifested" : 'Light on implicature' of Anandavardhana (c.875)

7. Rasa cannot be a figure of speech; It is what figures of speech ornament : 'The vital force of literary language' of Kuntaka (c.975)

8. There can be no "manifestation" of rasa : 'Analysis of "Manifestation"' of Mahima Bhatta (c.1025)

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐰𝐨: 𝐓𝐡𝐞 𝐠𝐫𝐞𝐚𝐭 𝐬𝐲𝐧𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐬𝐢𝐬 𝐨𝐟 𝐁𝐡𝐨𝐣𝐚 𝟏𝟎𝟐𝟓-𝟏𝟎𝟓𝟓

1. One rasa underlines all multiplicity : 'Neklace for the goddes of language' of Bhoja (c.1025) with the 'Commentary' of Bhatta Narasimha (undated)

2. One rasa underlines all multiplicity: The late statements : 'Light on passion' of 'Bhoja' (c.1050)

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐓𝐡𝐫𝐞𝐞: 𝐀𝐧 𝐚𝐞𝐬𝐭𝐡𝐞𝐭𝐢𝐜 𝐫𝐞𝐯𝐨𝐥𝐮𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧, 𝟗𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟎𝟎𝟎

1. From rasa in the text to rasa in the reader: core idas

...

2. From rasa in the text to rasa in the reader: elaboration

...

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐅𝐨𝐮𝐫: 𝐀𝐛𝐡𝐢𝐧𝐚𝐯𝐚𝐠𝐮𝐩𝐭𝐚 𝐚𝐧𝐝 𝐡𝐢𝐬 𝐬𝐜𝐡𝐨𝐨𝐥, 𝟏𝟎𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎

1. Rasa and the critique of imitation

...

2. The theory of rasa purified

...

3. Potential flaws of rasa

...

4. The purified theory in abstract

...

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐅𝐢𝐯𝐞: 𝐂𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐢𝐧𝐮𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐜𝐨𝐧𝐭𝐫𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫𝐬𝐢𝐞𝐬 𝐛𝐞𝐲𝐨𝐧𝐝 𝐊𝐚𝐬𝐡𝐦𝐢𝐫, 𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟒𝟎𝟎

1. Where is rasa? Is rasa always pleasurable?

...

2. A philosophical précis of the rasa problematic

...

3. Rethinking "Semblance of rasa"

...

𝐂𝐡𝐚𝐩𝐭𝐞𝐫 𝐒𝐢𝐱: 𝐫𝐚𝐬𝐚 𝐢𝐧 𝐭𝐡𝐞 𝐄𝐚𝐫𝐥𝐲 𝐌𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐫𝐧 𝐰𝐨𝐫𝐥𝐝, 𝟏𝟐𝟎𝟎-𝟏𝟔𝟓𝟎

1. A reader reading for rasa

...

2. A poet writing of rasa

...

3. Devotees experiencing rasa

...

4. Vedanticizing Rasa

English-Sanskrit glossary

From the early years of the Common Era to 1700, Indian intellectuals explored with unparalleled subtlety the place of emotion in art. Their investigations led to the deconstruction of art's formal structures and broader inquiries into the pleasure of tragic tales. Rasa, or taste, was the word they chose to describe art's aesthetics, and their passionate effort to pin down these phenomena became its own remarkable act of creation.

This book is the first in any language to follow the evolution of rasa from its origins in dramaturgical thought―a concept for the stage―to its flourishing in literary thought―a concept for the page. A Rasa Reader incorporates primary texts by every significant thinker on classical Indian aesthetics, many never translated before. The arrangement of the selections captures the intellectual dynamism that has powered this debate for centuries. Headnotes explain the meaning and significance of each text, a comprehensive introduction summarizes major threads in intellectual-historical terms, and critical endnotes and an extensive bibliography add further depth to the selections. The Sanskrit theory of emotion in art is one of the most sophisticated in the ancient world, a precursor of the work being done today by critics and philosophers of aesthetics. A Rasa Reader's conceptual detail, historical precision, and clarity will appeal to any scholar interested in a full portrait of global intellectual development.

A Rasa Reader is the inaugural book in the Historical Sourcebooks in Classical Indian Thought series, edited by Sheldon Pollock. These text-based books guide readers through the most important forms of classical Indian thought, from epistemology, rhetoric, and hermeneutics to astral science, yoga, and medicine. Each volume provides fresh translations of key works, headnotes to contextualize selections, a comprehensive analysis of major lines of development within the discipline, and exegetical and text-critical endnotes, as well as a bibliography. Designed for comparativists and interested general readers, Historical Sourcebooks is also a great resource for advanced scholars seeking authoritative commentary on challenging works.

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