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Heretics, schismatics, or Catholics? : Latin attitudes to the Greeks in the long twelfth century / Savvas Neocleous.

By: Neocleous, Savvas [author.].
Contributor(s): Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies [publisher.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Studies and texts (Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies): 216.Publisher: Toronto : Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2019Description: xv, 291 str. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0888442165; 9780888442161.Subject(s): Latinsko Carstvo | Bizantsko Carstvo | Europa | kršćanstvo | katolička crkva | pravoslavna crkva | hereze | 12. stoljećeAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Heretics, schismatics, or Catholics?
Contents:
From Pope Gregory VII to the eve of the Second Crusade -- From the Second Crusade to the end of Manuel's reign -- The last two decades of the twelfth century (1180-1198) -- From the preaching of the Fourth Crusade to the Latin conquest of Constantinople (1198-1204) -- Reaction to 1204 and attitudes toward the conquered Greeks : the official Latin church -- Reaction to 1204 and attitudes toward the conquered Greeks : evidence from Latin writers.
Summary: "According to a pervasive belief in modern academic, educational and popular literature, the antagonism on religious and cultural grounds between the two parts of medieval Christendom, the Latinised West and the Hellenised East, eventually led to the "schism of 1054." Not long after the schism, in 1204, Constantinople was captured and sacked by the armies of the Fourth Crusade. This study, the first to deal exclusively with Latin perceptions of and attitudes toward the Greeks in terms of religion, aims to revisit and challenge the view that the so-called schism between the Latin and Greek Churches led to the isolation of the Byzantine Empire by the Latin states and eventually to the events of 1204. It investigates a wide range of often neglected historiographical, theological, and literary sources as well as letters, and demonstrates the persistence of a paradigm of shared unity between Latins and Greeks and their polities within an integral Christendom over the course of the long twelfth century."--
List(s) this item appears in: 2019 - POVIJEST PRINOVE | 2020 - POVIJEST PRINOVE
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From Pope Gregory VII to the eve of the Second Crusade -- From the Second Crusade to the end of Manuel's reign -- The last two decades of the twelfth century (1180-1198) -- From the preaching of the Fourth Crusade to the Latin conquest of Constantinople (1198-1204) -- Reaction to 1204 and attitudes toward the conquered Greeks : the official Latin church -- Reaction to 1204 and attitudes toward the conquered Greeks : evidence from Latin writers.

"According to a pervasive belief in modern academic, educational and popular literature, the antagonism on religious and cultural grounds between the two parts of medieval Christendom, the Latinised West and the Hellenised East, eventually led to the "schism of 1054." Not long after the schism, in 1204, Constantinople was captured and sacked by the armies of the Fourth Crusade. This study, the first to deal exclusively with Latin perceptions of and attitudes toward the Greeks in terms of religion, aims to revisit and challenge the view that the so-called schism between the Latin and Greek Churches led to the isolation of the Byzantine Empire by the Latin states and eventually to the events of 1204. It investigates a wide range of often neglected historiographical, theological, and literary sources as well as letters, and demonstrates the persistence of a paradigm of shared unity between Latins and Greeks and their polities within an integral Christendom over the course of the long twelfth century."--

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