Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Magic tales and fairy tale magic : from Ancient Egypt to the Italian Renaissance / Ruth B. Bottigheimer.

By: Bottigheimer, Ruth B.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Palgrave historical studies in witchcraft and magic.Publisher: Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire (GB) (etc.) : Palgrave Macmillan, 2014Description: VII, 208 str. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781349479467.Subject(s): bajke - povijest | magija | magični motivi | narodna vjerovanja | mitologija
Contents:
1.Tales, Magic, and Fairy Tales 2.Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Magic Tales 3.Jewish Magic Tales 4.Magic Tales in Medieval Christian Europe 5.Magic Tales in the Muslim Middle Ages 6.Magic at Court and on the Piazza 7.Problematics of Magic on the Threshold of Fairy Tale Magic 8.The Evolution of Fairy Tale Magic from Straparola and Basile to Perrault 9.Afterword.
Summary: This book details magic's generally maleficent effect on human beings from ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages, including tales from classical mythology, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Bottigheimer shows that certain magical motifs lived on from age to age, but that it took until the Italian Renaissance for magic tales to become fairy tales. Scores of forgotten or little known tales are re-told, allowing readers to form their own conclusions along with the author's analyses.
List(s) this item appears in: ETN ANT Bilten prinova 6-9/2021
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.

Bibliografija: str. 185-198

Kazalo

1.Tales, Magic, and Fairy Tales 2.Egyptian, Greek, and Roman Magic Tales 3.Jewish Magic Tales 4.Magic Tales in Medieval Christian Europe 5.Magic Tales in the Muslim Middle Ages 6.Magic at Court and on the Piazza 7.Problematics of Magic on the Threshold of Fairy Tale Magic 8.The Evolution of Fairy Tale Magic from Straparola and Basile to Perrault 9.Afterword.

This book details magic's generally maleficent effect on human beings from ancient Egypt through the Middle Ages, including tales from classical mythology, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim cultures. Bottigheimer shows that certain magical motifs lived on from age to age, but that it took until the Italian Renaissance for magic tales to become fairy tales. Scores of forgotten or little known tales are re-told, allowing readers to form their own conclusions along with the author's analyses.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha

//