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An early Ottoman history : the Oxford anonymous chronicle (Bodleian Library, Ms Marsh 313) / historical introduction, translation, and commentary by Dimitri J. Kastritsis.

By: Kastritsis, Dimitri J.
Series: Translated texts for Byzantinists. Translated texts for Byzantinists ; 5.Publisher: Liverpool : Liverpool university press, 2017Description: XII, 253 str. : ilustr. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781789620740.Subject(s): Osmansko carstvo
Contents:
Acknowledgements -- Note on style and transliteration -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction. Oxford Anonymous (Marsh 313) in the context of early Ottoman historical writing -- Description and history of the manuscript -- The author and circumstances of composition -- Overview of the contents -- The introductory chapters and their significance -- The sections on Ottoman history -- 2 Translation. Preface -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Inquiry 2 (Orhan) -- Inquiry 3 (Murad I -- Inquiry 4 (Bayezid I) -- Inquiry 5 (Mehmed I) -- Inquiry 6 (Murad II) -- Inquiry 7 (Mehmed II) -- Inquiry 8 (Bayezid II) -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: The manuscript translated here contains one of the most important texts for understanding the development of early Ottoman historiography in the fifteenth century. The so-called Oxford Anonymous chronicle is a comprehensive history of the Ottoman dynasty in Turkish, compiled from various sources to tell the story of the dynasty from its rise to the year 1484 (AH 889). Like several other histories produced around the same time, some of which it influenced, it presents the Ottomans in the context of wider Islamic history and contains a coherent argument for their superiority over other dynasties. The manuscript had previously belonged to the Dutch orientalist Jacob Golius (d. 1667). Although its history is largely unknown, it was probably a presentation copy made for Sultan Bayezid II (r. 1481–1512). The work itself is a product of Bayezid’s patronage, and shows a strong preoccupation with the perennial Ottoman problem of dynastic succession. Fully one third of the manuscript contains an older text recounting in epic terms the struggles of Mehmed I against his brothers (1402–13). The obvious explanation is that when Oxford Anonymous was compiled, Bayezid II was also facing a rival claimant to the throne, his brother Cem Sultan (d. 1495). (Publisher's description)
List(s) this item appears in: KLF - Prinove 2022
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Knjiga Knjiga Knjižnica FFZG
4. kat, klasična filologija
Klasična filologija ED28 KAS e (Browse shelf) Available 1305287908
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Kazalo.

bibliografija: str. [223]-232.

Acknowledgements -- Note on style and transliteration -- Abbreviations -- 1 Introduction. Oxford Anonymous (Marsh 313) in the context of early Ottoman historical writing -- Description and history of the manuscript -- The author and circumstances of composition -- Overview of the contents -- The introductory chapters and their significance -- The sections on Ottoman history -- 2 Translation. Preface -- Chapter 1 -- Chapter 2 -- Inquiry 2 (Orhan) -- Inquiry 3 (Murad I -- Inquiry 4 (Bayezid I) -- Inquiry 5 (Mehmed I) -- Inquiry 6 (Murad II) -- Inquiry 7 (Mehmed II) -- Inquiry 8 (Bayezid II) -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Index.

The manuscript translated here contains one of the most important texts for understanding the development of early Ottoman historiography in the fifteenth century. The so-called Oxford Anonymous chronicle is a comprehensive history of the Ottoman dynasty in Turkish, compiled from various sources to tell the story of the dynasty from its rise to the year 1484 (AH 889). Like several other histories produced around the same time, some of which it influenced, it presents the Ottomans in the context of wider Islamic history and contains a coherent argument for their superiority over other dynasties. The manuscript had previously belonged to the Dutch orientalist Jacob Golius (d. 1667). Although its history is largely unknown, it was probably a presentation copy made for Sultan Bayezid II (r. 1481–1512). The work itself is a product of Bayezid’s patronage, and shows a strong preoccupation with the perennial Ottoman problem of dynastic succession. Fully one third of the manuscript contains an older text recounting in epic terms the struggles of Mehmed I against his brothers (1402–13). The obvious explanation is that when Oxford Anonymous was compiled, Bayezid II was also facing a rival claimant to the throne, his brother Cem Sultan (d. 1495). (Publisher's description)

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